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Your career and life are filled with accomplishments – times when you went "above and beyond" the scope of your job responsibilities or your own expectations of yourself (on the job or off the job). Accomplishment Stories state very specifically what positive things you have done for your previous or current employer, and therefore clearly indicate what you will be able to achieve for your NEW employer!

Use the Develop Accomplishment Stories form to write your Accomplishment Stories You'll be TELLING these stories; not including the text in your WTV. So, you'll want to commit the story to memory and practice delivering them! The more accomplishment stories you write the better. Even if you do not include one of your stories as a bullet point in your WIP, you can still tell it if appropriate.



Accomplishment Stories

Accomplishment Story Categories

Title
Write a memorable and strong title that communicates the content of the story. For example: “Establishing a New Sales Program That Resulted in $250,000 in Revenue Year 1,” “Saving a Client through Excellent Customer Service,” or “Leading a Successful Fundraiser for Juvenile Diabetes.

Situation
Describe the situation you were in or the task that you needed to accomplish. You must describe a specific event or situation, not give a generalized description of what you have done in the past. Be sure to give enough detail for the interviewer to understand. This situation can be from a previous job, from a volunteer experience, or any relevant event.

Barriers
Write about the barriers or obstacles you had to overcome to reach your results. The barriers are the problems you resolved. Often the barriers are lack of resources (people or money), lack of infrastructure, or long established practices (and thinking) that needed to be changed.

Actions
What did YOU do specifically to achieve your results? You may have been part of a team, so acknowledge the team but focus on your specific actions. Even if you are discussing a group project or effort, describe what you did – not the efforts of the team. Don’t tell what you might do, tell what you did.

Results
What were the results? How did the event end? What did you accomplish? Again be specific and if you have numbers use them. Numbers always impress employers (funds raised, percentage increase in sales, percentage decrease in expenses, product revenues, shortened product to market time line, etc.)

Skills Used

Write down the skills you used. Skills include things like leadership, creativity, persuasion, analysis, negotiation, project management, budgeting, team building, etc. These are the skills you bring to the prospective job. Unlike in the rest of your Accomplishment Story, you can simply list these skills. There is no need to put them in sentence form.

Once you have written your stories, you can save and print them to have for review and memorization. It is also highly recommended that you build an online portfolio (see WTV development center menu) where you may select which stories you would like to present under the “Accomplishments” tab.


Sample

Accomplishment Story Title
Scitex Interview Presentation lands the offer

Situation
In 1989, I was competing for a sales position with Scitex America, the global leader in color prepress systems. I was called back after the first in person interview and was to meet with the VP of Sales. This was a huge opportunity to move my career forward!

Barriers
The VP was an accomplished, confident sales management professional and had a heavy dose of type A. The challenge was to "get his attention" and communicate why I should be selected. This would be about a one hour meeting where I would pass or fail. I needed to pass and make an indelible impression so I would get the offer.

Actions
In order to be creative and differentiate myself, I came up with an idea. I had recently been through a professional selling course where we practiced by presenting our solutions on a flipchart to the prospective buyer. The flow of the presentation was based upon solution sales techniques which simply means doing a thorough job of uncovering what the client really needs and how "my products or services" could benefit them. I crafted my table top flipchart presentation with a fancy magic marker.

Results
After asking the VP of Sales for permission to "share" the presentation I had prepared, I methodically went through the "hiring criteria" and specifically why I matched up well and how quickly I could be productive for him. I watched his body language very closely and he was totally engaged and firing questions. Toward the end I asked for the job and he said yes, you are in!

Skills Used
proactivity, solutions sales techniques, creativity, listening, presentation skills, body language reading


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